Relative clauses

November 25, 2016 at 5:52 pm | Posted in Relative Clauses, relatives | Leave a comment
Tags: , , ,

Relatives

Relatives are a good way of connecting ideas and avoid repetitions. There are pronouns and adverbs and the clauses that carry them can be divided in two major groups: defining and non-defining, depending on their role.

relatives1

 

Defining relative clauses

The young teacher, who graduated from the same university I did, gave a wonderful presentation.

Stratford-on-Avon, about which many people have written, is Shakespeare’s birthplace.

Doctors use a new testing kit for screening lung and stomach cancers, which account for 70% of cancers treated in the western world.

She’s studying to become a doctor, which is difficult.

Summing up the differences:

difference-between-defining-and-non-defining-relative-clauses-infographic

 

Relative clauses & prepositionsrelative-prep2

If the verb in the relative clause takes a preposition, we may put it at the end of the clause or at the beginning, but that can cause some changes in the sentence:

 

For example: talk to / work with / apply for / complain about / listen to

  •  The shop assistant (who or whom / that) he talked to on that day had been recently hired.
  • He couldn’t forget the music (that/which) he had listened to.
  • He got the job (that/which) he had applied for.
  • Stratford-on-Avon, which many people have written about, is Shakespeare’s birthplace.

OR

  • The shop assistant to whom he talked on that they had been recently hired. (more formal)
  • Stratford-on-Avon, about which many people have written, is Shakespeare’s birthplace.

Note: In that case that can’t be used.

Shall we try some exercises now?

Exercise 1

Exercise 2

Exercise 3

Exercise 4

Exercise 5

 

Advertisements

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

%d bloggers like this: